Infants/Toddlers/Preschool1 Tbsp size serving for every year of age

 

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Limit high-fat foods and sweets as much as possible – nutrient dense foods are necessary for rapid growth and development. Foods contributing extra calories without the nutritional benefits will take the place of the nutrient dense foods necessary. Snack foods and desserts are not needed and should be considered “occasional” or “sometimes” foods—not daily or multiple times a week even.

 

2-4 year olds:     1,000 to 1,200 calories per day

                                     (5-6 mini-meals = 3 small meals + 2-3 planned snacks per day)

                                 3-4 ounces grain (at least ½ should be whole grains)

                                 1-1 ½ cups vegetable

                                 1 cup fruit

                                 2-2 ½ cups dairy

                                 2-3 ounces protein

                                 3 Tbsp oils (max per day)

 

 

School-age Children –  Think ½ cup size portions

 

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Limit high-fat foods and sweets as much as possible – they will only displace more nutrient dense foods from the diet and cause nutrient deficiencies at the expense of excess calories. Protein and complex carbohydrates are very important for the right fuel. Calorie needs will be based upon a range and decided by their activity level. If children are very active their calorie needs would be on the upper end of the range and if mainly sedentary then on the lower end of the range.

 

5-11 year olds:    1,400 to 2,000 calories per day

                                  5-6 ounces grain (at least ½ should be whole grains)

                                  2 cups vegetable

                                  1 ½ cups fruit

                                  5 ounces protein

                                  3 cups dairy

                                  4 Tbsp oils (max per day)

 

Check out the following video from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics:

Healthy Snacks for Kids

 

 

Teens (Middle and High Schoolers) - Think 1 cup size portions

 

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Limit high-fat foods and sweets as much as possible-they will only displace more nutrient dense foods from the diet and cause nutrient deficiencies at the expense of excess calories. This age group typically consumes a diet without enough calcium or protein to meet their needs. Calorie needs are based upon activity level and gender (active boys tend to need the high end of the range).

 

12-18 year olds:     1,600 to 3,000 calories per day

                                     6 ounces grain (at least ½ should be whole grain)

                                     3 cups vegetable

                                     2 cups fruit

                                     5-6 ounces protein

                                     3 cups dairy

                                     5-6 Tbsp oils (max per day)

 

 

 

Adults and Older Adults - Think 1 cup size portions

 

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Adults should also limit their high-fat foods and sweets to prevent nutrient deficiencies from nutrient dense foods being displaced in the diet. Calorie needs vary based upon activity level, age and gender.

 

Tools such as the Supertracker on www.choosemyplate.gov can help to determine specific caloric and nutrient recommendations.  

 

 

 

 

 

Check out the following video from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics:

Eating Right for Older Adults

 

 


 

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